Greenhouse Gas Regulation

Greenhouse gas regulation is defined as the ability of a forested ecosystem to sequester and store greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide).
Aboveground carbon mitigation is estimated as the sum of standing carbon, carbon storage in long-lived wood products, and the carbon benefit associated with substituting biomass for fossil-intensive products.
The value of aboveground carbon mitigation Hubbard Brook was represented by the estimated standing biomass in each catchment transformed to total aboveground carbon. The carbon benefit associated with the use of harvested wood products is not included at this time. 


The value of the aboveground GHG regulation service at TLW was represented by the estimated standing biomass in each catchment transformed to total aboveground carbon. The carbon benefit associated with the use of harvested wood products is not included at this time. 

Belowground GHG is represented by the net belowground flux of component GHGs on a carbon-equivalent basis (calculated using EPA TRACI).
Gas flux at Hubbard Brook was measured within two catchments using a gas flux chamber. Total flux of belowground greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) from watersheds 1 and 6 is illustrated. Values were transformed to carbon dioxide equivalents using EPA TRACI characterization weights. It can be seen that overall GHG flux in these watersheds is largely driven by carbon dioxide.